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The only entry at your level is ACCS...as it’s the the first three years of run through EM training. Audit/Quip in an EM setting EM online learning Teaching EM conferences Also see the previous answer on question #6374 Please review the presentations
The National recruitment office website, https://gprecruitment.hee.nhs.uk/ , will contain all the application timelines with the Aug 2021 advert usually published in Nov. Deferment is only permitted on statutory grounds, for which more info can be seen in the Gold Guide, https://www.copmed.org.uk/gold-guide-8th-edition/ , or on the NRO website. Please review the GP specialty presentation which answers all these questions and more
Which hospital appointed to as a consultant will have a huge impact in daily life - DGH versus teaching hospital. Working less than full time is also increasingly common in some medical hospital specialties. Whichever route taken however requires hard work, determination and sometimes long hours (going the extra mile) that vocational work demands. I personally do very long days (>12 hours), work weekends and do over night on calls which is very demanding but I doubt palliative care consultants would be in at night as much. Palliative care ST doctors do usually take part in GIM on call rotas now too. Admin for patient care will be demanding whether in community or hospital setting - it is all heading on line though with move towards paperless records! I recommend trainee has some Taster days in both settings, talks widely to doctors in training and in destination roles and speaks to their PG tutors. Please review specialty presentations for additional information
Update from GP - I love GP for several reasons, but two of these are that it provides me with the work/life balance I am after, and also the wealth of opportunities it offers in terms of developing interests and creating your own working week. I am a portfolio GP and love the variety of roles I hold. The working days in GP are intense, though, I tend to finish when I would like on the majority of days. A lot of this is down to your character type – how you manage your workload etc. View the contact presentation and make contact with those already doing the doing, they are happy to help.
See earlier answer for ICM /ACCS including links - plus view the specialty presentations for additional information. F3 posts – some links I have found with interesting ideas. https://www.mncjobs.co.uk/jobs/f3-doctor-stoke-on-trent-888553 https://lonkssfoundation.hee.nhs.uk/f3opportunities https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/projects/outputs/what-consider-if-youre-thinking-about-year-out https://themsag.com/blogs/life-as-a/life-as-an-f3-year-doctor Lots of contacts on the contact presentation, so make contact with someone who is already doing what you want to do so they can tell you about their experiences.
I think allocation is always done on a points systems and is independent of other parallel applications? Not sure if you mean cardiology / endocrinology/ neurology or if you mean O & G versus Medicine versus GP??? - Sorry question not very clear - Please review specialty presentations for additional information and also make sure of the contacts detailed on the contacts presentation
Please review the specialty presentations and then the contact presentation and make contact with those in your chosen field, those doing are the best to provide advice. Links that may also assist are: https://www.accs.ac.uk/accs https://rcoa.ac.uk/training-careers/training-anaesthesia https://www.ficm.ac.uk/trainingcurricula-and-assessment/core-and-specialist-training
Please review the specialty presentation which has the links included to competition ratios and also person specification. No priority is provided to internationals, all applications are taken on merit, examination results etc. With regards to Oriel I would contact their helpdesk to provide you with assistance.
For GP application timeline, please copy the link which will take you to the GP recruitment timeline page https://gprecruitment.hee.nhs.uk/Recruitment Update - GP R1 Advert Nov 2020 MSRA window usually early Jan 2021 No selection centre this year Portfolio and CV have to be submitted but these are not marked Offers should be out Feb Update - The National recruitment office website will contain all the application timelines with the Aug 2021 advert usually published in Nov. This website will also guide you through the longlisting process, which, assuming you have completed Foundation competencies, means you will be eligible to sit the MSRA – which is based on SJT-type questions as well as clinical questions. Many students will revise for this through various questions banks/courses, though none of which are condoned by the NRO. Do practise their own sample questions to get used to the format and timings. Offers are currently solely based only on your MSRA score, with no selectio
See NRO website which is currently showing dates for Feb 2020 start but still has the dates on the scroll down menu for Aug 2020. The timeframe will be much the same for Aug 2021 … advert for R1 Aug 2021 will be out usually November with MRSA in early Jan. There is no selection centre interview aspect this year. Update - The National recruitment office website will contain all the application timelines with the Aug 2021 advert usually published in Nov. This website will also guide you through the longlisting process, which, assuming you have completed Foundation competencies, means you will be eligible to sit the MSRA – which is based on SJT-type questions as well as clinical questions. Many students will revise for this through various questions banks/courses, though none of which are condoned by the NRO. Do practise their own sample questions to get used to the format and timings. Offers are currently solely based only on your MSRA score, with no selection centres being run in lig
GP R1 Advert Nov 2020 MSRA window usually early Jan 2021 No selection centre this year Portfolio and CV have to be submitted but these are not marked Offers should be out Feb Update - The National recruitment office website will contain all the application timelines with the Aug 2021 advert usually published in Nov. This website will also guide you through the longlisting process, which, assuming you have completed Foundation competencies, means you will be eligible to sit the MSRA – which is based on SJT-type questions as well as clinical questions. Many students will revise for this through various questions banks/courses, though none of which are condoned by the NRO. Do practice their own sample questions to get used to the format and timings. Offers are currently solely based only on your MSRA score, with no selection centres being run in light of Covid. Please also review the specialty presentation for additional information.
From August 2021, all GP Training will be 1 year hospital and 2 years GP. In the West Midlands it will be 3x 4m hospital attachments then probably 2x12m GP attachments but possibly 2x6m attachments in ST2 before 12m ST3. In other areas they may be offering 2x6m attachments in hospital but I think 3 attachments is advantageous. Please also view the specialty presentation for additional information.
Here are some links – there are several paths into EM at CT level as well as RTT. I have cut and pasted from the EM web site (below links). I don’t think any pathway is more valued as there are core curricular competencies that are relevant to EM for many subspecialties. I have also included some links for students – most university medical schools will have an EM society. https://www.accs.ac.uk/accs https://www.rcem.ac.uk/ https://su.nottingham.ac.uk/activities/view/emergency-medicine http://isaem.net/ Accreditation of Transferable Competences (ATC) The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has employed the Accreditation of Transferable Competences Framework (ATCF) to allow trainees entering Emergency Medicine training from GMC approved training programmes in ACCS (Anaesthesia), ACCS (General Internal Medicine – GIM), ACCS (ICM), Core Medical Training (CMT), Core Surgical Training (CST), Core Anaesthesia Training (CAT) and GP training to have some of the competences they have acq
Core Anaesthesia Training (CAT) and GP training to have some of the competences they have acquired in these programmes transferred into their EM training. The table below gives an idea of how much time could be counted in each instance. Emergency Medicine Run Through Training (RTT) and Defined Route of Entry to Emergency Medicine (DRE-EM) programmes Following successful pilots, the GMC have approved the Emergency Medicine Run Through Training (RTT) and Defined Route of Entry to Emergency Medicine (DRE-EM) programmes on a permanent basis with effect from 31 July 2017. Run Through Training (RTT) As described above, successful applicants to EM ACCS training posts can choose whether or not to enter an RTT post. Defined Route of Entry to Emergency Medicine (DRE-EM) DRE-EM is an entry point to ST3 for trainees who have a background in Core Surgical Training or a background in non-training posts in Emergency Depts. More details about entry requirements can be found in the table o
More details about entry requirements can be found in the table on page two of the ST3/DRE-EM person spec. Please review specialty presentation for additional information including a link to person spec. Also review the contact presentation.
F3 is an option for all F2’s but I am not sure about the Visa situation (I understand that each employer has to apply for the Visa which is why it may be complicated) - here are some helpful links to BMA & RCP about visa’s. It sounds more like a clinical attachment that F2 is discussing but here are some links about clinical fellowships too. https://www.bma.org.uk/advice-and-support/international-doctors https://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/education-practice/advice/medical-training-initiative-resources-applicants https://www.royalwolverhampton.nhs.uk/work-with-us/clinical-fellowship-programme/ https://www.nihr.ac.uk/documents/2020-nihr-acf-guidance-for-recruitment-and-appointment-medical/22472 https://www.nihr.ac.uk/explore-nihr/academy-programmes/integrated-academic-training.htm Please view specialty presentations and also make use of the contacts presentation list.
Very different career pathways although there is some overlap - https://www.rcog.org.uk/en/about-us/specialist-societies/faculty-of-sexual--reproductive-healthcare-fsrh/ GUM training may require some commitment to GIM on call depending on the rotation appointed to. Here is link to GUM web page which illustrates “day in the life of” https://www.st3recruitment.org.uk/specialties/genitourinary-medicine I suggest FY1 organises some time in both specialties as a “Taster”, talks to CT, ST doctors & PG tutors in their own Trust and also visits both Royal college pages. https://www.rcog.org.uk/ https://www.bashh.org/bashh-groups/doctors-in-training/gum-training/ Please view specialty presentations and contact lists.
F3 is a good option and will not be detrimental. A link to endocrine training is below. https://www.jrcptb.org.uk/specialties/endocrinology-and-diabetes-mellitus Lots of options for studying Endocrinology as Msc – several links below. https://www.endocrinology.org/news/item/10314/Academic-Clinical-Fellowship-in-Endocrinology--Metabolic-Medicine-Birmingham http://www.bartsendocrinology.co.uk/resources/ACF+description+for+Barts+Endo+website.docx As long as F1 completes all the Foundation competencies and shows some interest by doing a “taster” in Endocrine medicine they will be well placed to apply for IMT. Please also review specialty presentation for additional information.
In the first instance it probably needs to be discussed with a GP or GP trainee. May be worth chatting to Chris (Christopher Boyson Christopher.Boyson@hee.nhs.uk) or one of local TPDs. They may even be able to put you in contact with other anaethetists who have switched. Happy to answer any specific questions regarding career in GP. Update - You have obviously progressed and invested a significant time in anesthetics. It is important to understand the reasons why you wish to change career to make sure you will not face similar issues in GP. In addition, if it is related to work / life balance there are ways to improve this in anesthesia eg LTFT or staff grade covering day time service lists etc. I would first advise you speak with your nES / anaesthetic college tutor or anaes TPD to ensure leaving anaesthetics is the correct choice. In addition I would advise you contact a GP TPD to ensure GP is the correct move
Update - I would certainly arrange some career taster sessions, though these may well have to be virtually now, unless you can find an accommodating practice who would be willing to have you attend in person. I am beginning to put together some remote taster sessions/video clips which will be available soon. I think an important question is to ask yourself is what has prompted you to want to switch to GP. What kind of things does GP offer you, that anaesthetics doesn’t – I can certainly think of a lot of reasons, but the answer to this question is always unique to the person. And perhaps, ask yourself why you didn’t apply for GP initially? I certainly understand it feels like a big decision to make after you have spent a number of years training in anaesthetics; however it is much better to do it now rather than in years to come, or not at all. Happy to discuss further over the phone at some point if needed. Chris Please see contact presentation for information, also view the
There is no harm in applying for MRSA even if you are planning to defer re-entry into training as it will keep you up to date with experience and knowledge required at the later stages when you are applying for GP/psychiatry training. ARCP doesn’t apply to non- training year as this will be your year out, however it is still advisable to continue doing CBDs Mini-aces in your locum job/jobs to maintain your own portfolio for later. Update - Recruitment is unlikely to go back to a centre induction with role playing for the foreseeable future if at all. There is not a lot to be gained by going through the process for the sake of practice. FY3 year ARCP and revalidation process remains within the Trust and Foundation School. FY3 is good preparation for GP training/psychiatry training. Most mental health is dealt with in primary care.
In the first instance please contact Dr Manning, a career tutor and paediatric trainee ( jonathan.manning2@nhs.net) or your local contact - please see contact presentation. Update - Thanks for contacting us, great that you are applying for paediatrics. My advice would be to show your enthusiasm for paediatrics through the application , why you want to be a pediatrician- what inspired you. Use your experiences to show this. This doesn’t need to be work related, could be to do with outside work things as well. For the application worth mentioning any paediatric experience- courses you might have been on with a paediatric theme, if you have done exams ( not essential ) any audits/ quality improvement related to paediatrics. With regards to the interview- we are looking for doctors who are able to have some basic paediatric knowledge ( not masses), able to communicate and show an enthusiasm for the specialty . View the specialty presentation for additional information.
You can sit for the Part 1 but unfortunately you are not entitled for the study leave or allowance. It is an extra-curricular work for FY1. Please speak to the RCPCH College Tutor in your hospital. Update - Foundation trainees can apply for them MRcPCH exams. The theory exams need to be completed first. Most sit the FoP first but that doesn’t have to be the case . Getting a head start is help for getting through the exams in a good time frame however is not essential . You won’t get study budget or leave for it If keen on paediatrics think about taster days in other paediatric areas - PICU/nicU to gain experience. Think about audit and QI projects I’m within paediatrics. Talk to others in the specialty to get support and advice For contact information please review the contact presentation.
1. You can get involved in teaching to students or FY1 or nursing students. Please speak to your CS or ES. 2. Publication for IMT application is an extra credit, not mandatory. Please do a clinical audit or QIP, related to Internal Medicine. 3. Please speak to our current IMT and Lead Career tutor, yimeng.zhang@nhs.net 4. I strongly encourage you to apply for IMT in round 1 as I think you will have a chance to have it. 5. If you want to purse a career in infectious disease and do a FY3 year, a diploma in tropical medicine (DTM&H) from London School of Tropical Medicine is the best qualification. But it is an expensive course and I think you have to fund yourself for the course after FY2 year. Full contact information can be found on the contact presentation.
Update - An IMT3 year would be much more useful for specialty training than an F3 year as you would be more experienced all round with additional acute medicine experience. Although you are right that you can go into ID/Med Micro after 2 years of IMT in practice we expect most applicants for ID/Micro to do the full 3 years of IMT. If you are left stranded at the end of F2 without an IMT post the options might include a research year, a year spent abroad, or gaining a Masters or Diploma in Tropical Medicine, all of which would enhance your CV and increase the likelihood of you gaining an IMT post and specialty training number in the future.
No. community work in Geriatric Medicine is a very small portion of the whole Geriatric Medicine curriculum. During the training, you need few exposures but you do not need to do it when you are a qualified geriatrician. Please review the specialty presentations to give you additional information
For paediatrics- apply for paediatric training on November and for GP-apply for GPVTS. You can apply both and then chose the best for you. Highly encourage to do taster if you want to have more exposures in both areas. Please review both specialty presentations to provide extra information
You are doing all the correct things. It is all about demonstrating 'career commitment' which is what you seem to be doing. Other options: 1)Many conferences are now being completed 'virtually' so it would be worth exploring this further. 2) Keep a log book of complimentary skills eg chest drains, central lines, airway management. If not competent to do on pt, then aim to get trained on skill simulators. 3) Arrange a meeting with the college tutor in EM to discuss career and ask for specific advice / tip on the application process. 4) It is an advantage to set up a teaching programme rather than just deliver a teaching session. Discuss with relevant individuals in your Trust eg nES to say that you would like to help coordinate a teaching programme eg for FY's, for non medical staff etc. There is a lot of opportunity currently with training moving to a virtual platform.
I’m not sure I’m only really familiar with the pathway in AIM. At the moment that is problematic with the introduction of IMT. I would suggest IMT is a better pathway and that ACCS may have problems. Gordon wood (Gordon.Wood@hee.nhs.uk )TPD for IMT or one within your local area. Please see contact presentation for information.
1. General Medical oncall rota is varied per the Trust/hospitals. 2. Specialist Registration via CESR route may be possible but it is not a straightforward process. Please remember that rheumatologists in NHS in future are expected to have dual accreditation-Rheumatology and General Internal Medicine and get involved in GIM on calls. As the IMT1, you may wish to speak to the RCP tutor in your hospital/trust for further advice. See contact presentation for details.
Use your taster days (5 days per year allowed) plus your self development time and take some taster session in the specialty. please kindly email to TPD of this specialty in your deanery. Please view the specialty presentation for additional information.
Yes of course you can sit MSRA exam, but for psychiatry training you do not need to do this exam and its only required for GP/other specialties, so in short you can sit if you want but if it’s the psychiatry you want to train then this is not required/essential. - Please review the specialty presentation for additional information
A couple of links that might be useful; 1 for working less than full time and the other the kinds of things that point score in an application to anesthetics. https://www.westmidlandsdeanery.nhs.uk/support/less-than-full-time-training/less-than-full-time-training-guide https://anro.wm.hee.nhs.uk/Portals/3/Documents/National/Self-Assessment%20Criteria%20AnaestheticsACCS%20Anaesthetics%20CT1(2020).pdf?ver=2019-10-21-090856-733 ACCS and core trainees apply through same portal. I think anaesthetic trainees have always rated their programmes highly – but it depends on where and to which program you are appointed to. Here is a link to a trainees thought about anaesthetic training https://www.grandisonportfolios.com/blog-1/apply-to-anaesthetics - lots of useful link on there too. Traditionally trainees have felt looked down upon for career breaks but my recent experiences of interviewing for ST posts showed me greater depth to candidates who have had career breaks including doing
non-medical post grad degrees, voluntary work overseas as well as traveling and experiencing different cultures. It definitely isn’t advised against but as ever it is about how you relate these experiences and what they have taught you (mapping your skillset to person specification).
Many thanks for your question, which is really several questions: Portfolio GPs is probably what the majority of GPs have where they might several roles or responsibilities. The working day is pretty full on but there is control over what you do day-to-day. Partnerships usually start from 4 sessions and go up to 8-9 sessions as determined by what you want to work. Similarly salaried roles are negotiable as to what days you work within a GP practice. Flexibility is appreciated if suddenly someone is unwell and a surgery needs covering. Most salaried doctors are really appreciated by practices. Within the practice, different doctors will take on different roles or responsibilities; one of which is women’s health and family planning. This is usually flexible role within the working week but is sometimes a set session. Sometimes the role will extend to the local area where a GP will be involved in coils or implants for a number of practices. Other GPs will work within the sexual healt
Other GPs will work within the sexual health clinics but these have been reduced with the Public Health cuts of a few years ago. I would contest that General Practice is not fast moving. It may be less acute but actually the challenges are more challenging as the GP is basically armed with consulting skills and a stethoscope, whilst a medical registrar usually has a bank of investigations to undertake before any decision is made. Perhaps I am being unfair. As a GP you have to be interested in the person whilst in secondary care the doctor is usually interested in the disease/diagnosis. A surgeon once said “a surgeon might save lives but a GP changes lives”. There are roles for GPs often with A/E settings or covering cottage hospitals, D2A beds or locality roles eg overseeing frailty or acute visiting services. There is a huge amount of medicine in GP but although there are guidelines on management, there is much more flexibility to apply the guidelines appropriately and sensibly
to fit the individual patient. Every patient is a diagnostic challenge. Having an interest in a medical specialty eg diabetes respiratory can be undertaken in GP without needing dual training. I oversea diabetes at our practice because I have an interest. Academic and research practices exist right across the regions. There is a research team with undertakes most of the day-to-day work. Some GP trainees will sign up for an academic training package whilst others will seek academic posts with Primary Care Research Departments or Universities after qualification. There academic training posts run from B’ham, Warwick and Keele and usually they 3rd year is split 50:50 with academic work and so runs over 24 months. Primary care research is real word research with real patients and real complexities. The other aspect of an academic career is teaching and training which is very vibrant and rewarding. This can be started during training and after training with med students, FY2 and GP tr
“If I understand your question correctly, you are asking if a Dermatology Clinical Fellow post would boost your chances when applying for an ST3 post. It is not essential but it may increase your chances of success and would certainly give you very useful clinical experience for an ST3 Dermatology post, especially if your experience in Dermatology so far is limited”. Additional Information - There is a research training structure in place in Dermatology called the National integrated academic training pathway’. During specialist training some centre offer Academic Clinical Fellowship (ACF) posts which provide protected time for research and pump prime funding to develop a project idea that will hopefully result in a successful extended research training fellowship application (RTF). The best way to get research experience is by applying through this integrated research training post. For more information contact: British Association of dermatologists www.bad.org.uk
Applications are down to programme level and so there should be capacity to apply to Welsh Deanery. You should be able to apply to programme level dependent on where you are going to be living. Welsh Deanery have been working with 12m hospital and 24m GP for the last 2 years. Apart from statutory deferrals there are no longer any deferrals in any of the home nations. There are some practices on Hereford and Shropshire training programmes which fall into Wales but it does make more sense to apply to Welsh schemes.
You would stay in region for three years but, if for example you applied to WM, it would be the whole of West Midlands. We try to keep trainees in same trust or nearby for all 3 years, but can’t guarantee it. The AM placements for WM are usually Russell’s Hall or Wolverhampton Additional Information - Anaesthetics offers career opportunities in a wide range of sub speciality areas all of which can be achieved by direct entry to an anaesthetic CCT program, however, those anaesthetic trainees with an interest in the acute end of the anaesthetic spectrum will find ACCS is an ideal career opportunity or starting point. It provides training with more widely based experience than is available via the core anaesthetic program. You are also expected to move around depending on the region and Trust that you're applying in and based in. Often the movements of these placements remain fairly local and drivable distances.
Eligibility of Palliative medicine is that the applicant should have physical training/MRCP Part one/completed, emergency medicine, a full MCEM by required deadline, General practice MRCGP, Surgery FRCS or anaesthetic FRCA. What would be useful to try getting involved into research in end of life care while working in these specialties, even as a FY trainee by having discussion with CS and ES.- Please review the specialty presentation for additional information
The Good Acute medicine offers a very case-mix with plenty of clinical detective work. Acute medicine units are often run by teams offering close support from the group of like-minded colleagues. Being a new specialty it allows consultant to have input into the development of services. Shift working pattern allows work life balance or the development of special special interest. The AMU is an ideal environment to develop teaching and training. There is opportunity to develop and practice specialist skills such as focused ultrasound. The Bad: The pressure of work can be intense and the continuity of care is limited. There is potential for conflicts over triage decisions and boundaries of responsibilities. You will not be the ‘expert’ opinion. A move to extended clinical cover will have the potential to make the hours of work more onerous
During your foundation year, FY1 and FY2 there is no requirement to take any exams for psychiatry however it would be beneficial to ensure that psychiatry remains part of your training during F1As well as F2 year. For further information please refer to choose psychiatry section of Royal College of psychiatry website as this will help you to make your decision. It contains personal testimony and day in the life stories from psychiatrist at different stages of their career as well as practical information about how to become a psychiatrist, pay, flexible training and other information. If you would like to pursue Less than full-time training (LTFT) then that information can also be found on the website. You would apply for this training as soon as you get into your core training.
Rheumatology incorporate the investigation, holistic management and rehabilitation of patience with a wide spectrum of disorders of the musculoskeletal system involving bone connected tissue and blood vessels. It provides an excellent opportunity to practice clinical medicine in its broadest sense with the principles of acute and chronic disease management at its core. It allows to care for a patient in holistic manner building therapeutic and educational relationship with them. There are two ways to enter into rheumatology training after finishing foundation years. Either to go training program which are two types core medical training (CMT) or acute-care common stem ACCS – AM.
Unfortunately there are currently no stand alone SHO posts in Public Health in the Midlands. We do have rotations for FY2 doctors and also for GP trainees. Please review the PH presentation for useful links. Additional Information - Public health Qualification MBBS or equivalent medical qualification or a 1st° or a higher certified degree masters or PhD Eligibility those with a medical degree applying for a medical training post in public health must be eligible for full registration wait and hold a current license to practice from the GMC at the intended start date and have a minimum of two years of post -graduate medical experience by time of appointment or evidence of current employment in the UK FPO affiliated foundation programme
There are two ways to enter into rheumatology training after finishing foundation years. Either to go training program which are two types core medical training (CMT) or acute-care common stem ACCS – AM. Also look at criteria for application. Audit/QUIP. MRCP part 1 AIM meetings AM ACCS isn’t very competitive though We encourage trainees at the foundation level to take taster weeks in the specialty they are intending to explore. This could involve shadowing consultants and registrars at clinical/academic level to get to know the specialty more.
Always go for what you’re interested in. Too many things change to try to predict what line would be like as a consultant. If your happy with the clinical work then you’ll be happy with whatever the workload is. If your career path is ICM then ACCS is the best choice for core training. You cannot transfer between streams (you resign and reapply) but any training you complete in ACCS can be recognised if you do change streams through. You can single CCT in ICM or dual. Dual gives you more options for place of work. Anaesthetics is the most flexible but you do need to enjoy anaesthesia. Acute Medicine would give you a few options as they tend to work shifts and that fits better with ICM. Please review the specialty presentations for useful information.
Please be more specific in relation to GP Training, what exactly would you like to know. Please re-submit your question. Thank you